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POL SCI 101 American Government and Politics

Elizabeth Wheat

Chicago Citation Resources

For a complete list of specifics about Chicago style for both the reference list and in-text citations, please visit your campus library or visit the Research Help page to ask library staff for a copy of The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition. Use the links above for examples, tips, and further help.

Common Chicago Examples (Notes-Bibliography)

Note:

1. Author A. Surname, "Article Title," Title of Journal Volume, no. Issue (Year): Page(s), DOI [or stable URL].

2. Surname, "Shortened Article Title," page(s).

 

1. Margaret Lock, “Comprehending the Body in the Era of the Epigenome,” Current Anthropology 56, no. 2 (April 2015): 155,  https://doi.org/10.1086/680350.

2. Lock, "Comprehending the Body," 163.

 

Bibliography:

Surname, Author A. "Article Title." Title of Journal. Volume, no. Issue (Year): Pages. DOI [or stable URL].
 
Lock, Margaret. "Comprehending the Body in the Era of the Epigenome.” Current Anthropology 56, no. 2 (April 2015): 151-77. https://doi.org/10.1086/680350.

Note:

1. Author A. Surname, Title of Book (City, State: Publisher, Year), page(s).

2. Surname, Shortened Title, page(s).

 

1. Atul Gawande, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End (London: Profile Books, 2014), 79-80

2. Gawande, Being Mortal, 191.

 

Bibliography:

Surname, Author A. Title of Book. City, State: Publisher, Year.
 
Gawande, Atul. Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. London: Profile Books, 2014.

Note:

1. Author A. Surname, "Title of Chapter," in Title of Book, ed. Editor E. Surname (City, State: Publisher, Year), page(s).

2. Surname, "Shortened Chapter Title," page(s).

 

1. Ruth A. Miller, "Posthuman," in Critical Terms for the Study of Gender, ed. Catharine R. Stimpson and Gilbert Herdt (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014), 325

2. Miller, "Posthuman," 327.

 

Bibliography:

Surname, Author A. "Title of Chapter." In Title of Book, edited by Editor E. Surname, pages. City, State: Publisher, Year.
 
Miller, Ruth A. "Posthuman." In Critical Terms for the Study of Gender, edited by Catharine R. Stimpson and Gilbert Herdt, 320-327. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014.

Note:

1. Author A. Surname, "Title of Web Page," Publishing Organization or Name of Website last modified Date [and/or accessed Date], URL.

2. Surname, "Shortened Page Title," Publishing Organization or Website.

 

1. J. Robert Lennon, “How Do You Revise?,” Ward Six (blog), September 16, 2010, http://wardsix.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-do-you-revise.html.

2. Lennon, "Revise," Ward Six.

 

Bibliography:

Surname, Author A. "Web Page Title." Publishing Organization or Name of Website. Last modified Date [and/or Accessed Date], URL.
 
Lennon, J. Robert. "How Do You Revise?.” Ward Six (blog). September 16, 2010. http://wardsix.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-do-you-revise.html.

*Citation examples taken from the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed. and the Purdue Online Writing Lab*

Reminder

  • Always follow any modifications to Chicago Style provided by your instructor.

Notes-Bibliography Style

  • Notes indicate you are quoting, summarizing, or paraphrasing someone else's work or ideas.
  • When you cite a source, add a superscript number at the end of your sentence. This corresponds to a note with the same number at the bottom of the page (footnote style) or at the end of the paper (endnote style).
  • If you cite the same source more than once, use a shortened version of the note after the first time (see examples above).
  • Sources cited in a note should also be listed in your bibliography, in alphabetical order, using bibliography format (see examples above).

Notes (In-Text Citation) Resources

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